Pain Research Group

Institute of Psychology
Faculty of Philosophy

Pain Research Group was founded at the Institute of Psychology of the Jagiellonian University in 2011. Now it consists of Prof. Przemysław Bąbel, who serves as a Principal Investigator, two post-docs, four PhD students and several collaborators affiliated with the Group, including another two post-docs. Research on experimentally induced pain is conducted at the Pain Research Laboratory that is equipped with specialized equipment, approved for use in humans, to apply electrocutaneous stimuli (Constant Current High Voltage Stimulator, Digitimer, model DS7AH, and DS8R Biphasic Constant Current Stimulator, Digitimer), thermal stimuli (Pathway Pain & Sensory Evaluation System, Medoc, model ATS), and pressure stimuli (Commander Algometer Pain Evaluation Tool, JTech Medical, and Computerized Pressure Algometer, Medoc).

Main lines of research: 1. Learning mechanisms of placebo effects in pain, i.e. placebo hypoalgesia/analgesia and nocebo hyperalgesia. Within this line, we investigate factors contributing to placebo effects in pain induced by classical conditioning, observational learning, operant conditioning. For example, we study whether expectancy is involved in placebo effects induced by classical conditioning or how the model’s characteristics influence placebo effects induced by observational learning. 2. Learning mechanisms of pain induction, i.e. allodynia. Within this line, we investigate whether pain sensation can be induced by classical conditioning, observational learning, operant conditioning. 3. Memory of pain. Within this line, we investigate factors contributing to distortions of the memory of pain of different origins. For example, we study how positive and negative affect, as well as type and meaning of pain, influence its memory. 4. The effects of colors on pain perception. Within this line, we investigate how different colors affect pain and what are the mechanisms of the effects of colors on pain perception. For example, we study whether expectations of the effects of colors on pain perceptions mediate their actual effects.